Publication Notices

Notifications of the Newest Publications and Reports Released by ERDC

Contact ERDC Library

 

erdclibrary@ask-a-librarian.info

601.501.7632 - text
601.634.2355 - voice

 

ERDC Library Catalog

Not finding what you are looking for? Search the ERDC Library Catalog

Results:
Category: Publications: Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL)
Clear
  • AIS Data Case Study: Dredge Material Placement Site Evaluation in Frederick Sound near Petersburg, Alaska

    Abstract: The purpose of this Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory Technical Note (CHETN) is to present an application of historic vessel position information acquired through the Automatic Identification System (AIS), which provides geo-referenced and time-stamped vessel position information. The US Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District (POA), needed to evaluate potential placement sites for dredged material near Petersburg, AK, and possible impacts to navigation were considered as part of the evaluation process.
  • Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) 2020 User’s Guide: Version 1.0

    Abstract: This special report acts as a user’s guide for the Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) toolbox within ArcGIS Pro. The SBAS toolbox is a free toolset that allows the user to create and visualize a sediment budget using ArcGIS Pro. Included in this report are instructions on how to download the toolbox and create a sediment budget.
  • Summary of Ground-Based Snow Measurements for the Northeastern United States

    ABSTRACT: Snow is an important resource for both communities and ecosystems of the Northeastern United States. Both flood risk management and water supply forecasts for major municipalities, including New York City, depend on the collection of snowpack information. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to summarize all of the snowpack data from ground-based networks currently available in the Northeast. The collection of snow-depth and snow water equivalent information extends back several decades, and there are over 2,200 active sites across the region. Sites are distributed across the entire range of elevations in the region. The number of locations collecting snow information has increased substantially in the last 20 years, primarily from the expansion of the CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow) network. Our summary of regional snow measurement locations provides a foundation for future studies and analysis, including a template for other regions of the United States.
  • South Shore of Long Island, New York Regional Sediment Management Investigation: An Overview of Challenges and Opportunities

    Abstract: The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting the “South Shore of Long Island, New York Regional Sediment Management Investigation” to further understand sediment dynamics and to develop a comprehensive regional sediment management plan for the south shore of Long Island, New York. Regional sediment management is a systems approach using best management practices for more efficient and effective use of sediments in coastal, estuarine, and inland environments. This investigation seeks to characterize sediment movement on the south shore of Long Island as a holistic system across the entire study area. It focuses on the regional system post-Hurricane Sandy (October 2012) as the storm significantly altered the physical landscape with severe shoreline erosion, which resulted in the construction of projects to reduce the risk of future storms and stakeholder priorities with a new emphasis on bay-side sediment dynamics, such as channel shoaling and disappearing wetlands. Despite the fact the storm caused severe erosion, the equilibrium beach profile, depth of closure, and general shoreline orientation seem to be unaffected. Previous studies have characterized sediment movement at specific sections of the south shore, but these data have not been incorporated to create a system-wide perspective. Coordinating sediment management across the six Atlantic Ocean inlets, Great South Bay Channel, Intracoastal Waterway, and coastal storm risk management (CSRM) projects could save the federal government millions of dollars in dredging and sand placement actions. This technical note presents the progress the investigation has made to date and will be followed with a more in-depth technical report titled South Shore of Long Island, New York Regional Sediment Management Investigation: A Post-Hurricane Sandy Shoreline Evaluation, currently in preparation.
  • Tombigbee River: River Miles 81.0–76.0 Sediment Management Study

    Abstract: The US Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis District, Applied River Engineering Center (AREC), in cooperation with the Operations Branch of the Mobile District, conducted a sediment management study of the Sunflower Bend reach of the Tombigbee River, between River Miles 81.0 and 76.0, near Jackson, AL. The objective of the study was to look at sediment management alternatives to alleviate or eliminate repetitive maintenance dredging. These alternatives involved various river engineering measures including dikes, weirs, channel armoring, disposal armoring, and combinations thereof. A physical Hydraulic Sediment Response model was used to examine the sediment response resulting from these alternatives. During model testing, and after discussions with AREC and Mobile Operations Division staff, a second objective was established to define existing non-erodible bed materials that were located throughout the reach. This was conducted to examine the merits of strategically removing these erosion resistant materials in the river as an additional dredging/excavation alternative. The most favorable alternatives involved removing bedload sand and consolidated clay material from between River Miles 79.1 and 78.0 to improve navigation.
  • Optimization of Reach-Scale Gravel Nourishment on the Green River below Howard Hanson Dam, King County, Washington

    Abstract: The US Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, nourishes gravel downstream of Howard Hanson Dam (HHD) on the Green River in Washington State. The study team developed numerical models to support the ongoing salmonid habitat improvement mission downstream of HHD. Recent advancements in computing and numerical modeling software make long-term simulations in steep, gravel, cobble, and boulder river environments cost effective. The team calibrated mobile-bed, sediment-transport models for the pre-dam and post-dam periods. The modeling explored geomorphic responses to flow and sediment regime changes associated with HHD construction and operation. The team found that pre-dam conditions were significantly more dynamic than post-dam conditions and may have had lower spawning habitat quality in the project vicinity. The team applied the Bank Stability and Toe Erosion Model to the site and then calibrated to the post-dam gravel augmentation period. The team implemented a new hiding routine in HEC-RAS that improved the simulated grain size trends but underestimated coarse sediment transport. Models without the hiding function overestimated grain size but matched bed elevations and mass flux very well. Decade-long simulations of four future gravel nourishment conditions showed continued sediment storage in the reach. The storage rate was sensitive to nourishment mass and grain size.
  • Setup and Data Collection Process of an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) in a Laboratory Setting

    Abstract: The purpose of this Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) is to outline experimental set up and the data collection process of an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) in a laboratory setting. The Nortek Vectrino ADV will be referenced in this CHETN as will the Nortek Comprehensive Manual for Velocimeters (Nortek AS 2018). Note that Nortek no longer sells the Vectrino, but the Vector, which is similar to the Vectrino aside from only having one configuration, is available.
  • Evaluating Cross-Shore Sediment Grain Size Distribution, Sediment Transport, and Morphological Evolution of a Nearshore Berm at Fort Myers Beach, Florida

    Abstract: Navigation channels are periodically dredged to maintain safe depths. Dredged sediment was historically placed in upland management areas or in offshore disposal areas. Florida state law prohibits placement of beach fill sediment that contains more than 10% by weight of silt and clay, which is typically a characteristic of dredged material. An alternative is placement in a nearshore berm. Some potential benefits of nearshore berms include wave energy dissipation, reduced cost of dredging and shore protection, and possible onshore movement of the berm material. This study considers sediment distribution, morphological evolution, sediment transport, and shoreline trends along Fort Myers Beach, Florida, related to the nearshore berm constructed in August 2016. Due to timing of the field study, this report also includes information on the influence of a major hurricane that impacted the area. The overall conclusion of this study is that the dredge-sourced sediment in the berm performed as expected. Within 2 years, the berm adjusted to the shoreface environment, maintained a large part of its original volume, and contributed to protection of the beach and shoreline. The impact of Hurricane Irma included a shift in sediment textures and a large but temporary increase in shoreface sediment volumes.
  • Wabash and Ohio River Confluence Hydraulic and Sediment Transport Model Investigation: A Report for US Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District

    Abstract: Avulsions of the Wabash River in 2008 through 2011 at its confluence with the Ohio River resulted in significant shoaling in the Ohio River. This caused a re-alignment of the navigation channel and the need for frequent dredging. A two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model, Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH), was developed to simulate base (existing) conditions and then altered to simulate multiple alternative scenarios to address these sediment issues. The study was conducted in two phases, Phase 1 in 2013 – 2015 and Phase 2 in 2018 – 2020. Field data were collected and consisted of multi-beam bathymetric elevations, bed sediment samples, suspended sediment samples, and discharge and velocity measurements. The model hydrodynamic and sediment transport computations adequately replicated the water surface slope, flow splits, bed sediment gradations, and suspended sediment concentrations when compared with field data. Thus, it was shown to be dependable as a predictive tool. The alternative that produced the most desirable results included a combination of three level-crested emergent dikes on Wabash Island and four submerged dikes on the Illinois shore with a level crest from the bank to the tip of the dike. The selected alternative produced an improved sailing line while maintaining authorized channel depths.
  • Walter Marine and Atlantic Reefmaker Wave Attenuator: Wave Transmission Testing Results

    Abstract: As part of a testing service agreement with Walter Marine and Atlantic Reefmaker, a 1:5.2 physical model of the Reefmaker Wave Attenuator was constructed and tested by the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center to evaluate its influence on wave attenuation. The tested prototype wave periods ranged from 2.5 to 8 sec with prototype wave heights between 1 ft and 6.5 ft. The Reefmaker Wave Attenuator included orthogonal and square designs and was tested under a variety of configurations including a suspended configuration, a bed-mounted configuration, and a rotated configuration. Testing demonstrated that depending on configurations and wavelength, the wave transmission coefficients ranged from 0.29 to 0.70. The most improvement, however, was demonstrated when testing the square unit designs with transmission coefficients, kt, below 0.51. The smallest kt of 0.29 occurred during square unit testing, which consisted of eight bed-mounted, square Ecosystem disks plus a base unit (24.05 in. freeboard) and with a wave period of 3.0 sec and height of 0.84 ft. Of all 134 tests performed, including the suspended case, the average transmission through the structure was 58%.