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  • Risk-Based Prioritization of Operational Condition Assessments: Jennings Randolph Case Study

    Abstract: The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) operates, maintains, and manages over $232 billion worth of the Nation’s water resource infrastructure. Using Operational Condition Assessments (OCA), the USACE allocates limited resources to assess asset condition in efforts to minimize risks associated with asset performance degradation, but decision makers require a greater understanding of those risks. The analysis of risk associated with Flood Risk Management assets in the context of its associated watershed system includes understanding the consequences of the asset’s failure and a determination of the likelihood that the asset will perform as expected given the current OCA ratings of critical components. This research demonstrates an application of a scalable methodology to model the probability of a dam performing as expected given the state of its subordinate gates and their components. The research team combines this likelihood with consequences generated by the application of designed simulation experiments with hydrological models to develop a measure of risk. The resulting risk scores serve as an input for an optimization program that outputs the optimal set of components to conduct OCAs on to minimize risk in the watershed. Proof-of-concept results for an initial case study on the Jennings Randolph Dam are provided.
  • 2020 Guided Wave Inspection of California Department of Water Resources Tainter Gate Post-Tensioned Trunnion Anchor Rods: Oroville Dam

    Abstract: The Engineering and Test Branch within the Division of Operations and Maintenance of the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Sacramento District, tasked the Sensor Integration Branch (SIB) at the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) to perform non-destructive testing (NDT) on the trunnion anchor rods at Oroville Dam through the use of ultrasonic guided waves. This is the third year of this NDT. The results of the testing are presented along with qualitative analysis in determining whether a rod is in-tact or compromised. Analysis is based upon the expected results from other rods at the site, knowledge of rod response at other sites, data gathered from the trunnion rod research test bed at the ERDC, and comparison to the previous year’s effort.
  • Acoustic Nondestructive Testing and Measurement of Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members

    Abstract: Many concrete structures contain internal post-tensioned steel structural members that are subject to fracturing and corrosion. The major problem with conventional tension measurement techniques is that they use indirect and non-quantitative methods to determine whether there has been a loss of tension. We have developed an acoustics-based technology and method for making quantitative tension measurements of an embedded, tensioned steel member. The theory and model were verified in the laboratory using a variety of steel rods as test specimens. Field tests of the method were conducted at three Corps of Engineers dams, located in Oklahoma, Georgia, and Illinois. Measurements of the longitudinal and shear velocity were able to be made on rods up to 50 ft long. Not all rods of this length were able to be measured and the quality and consistency of the signal varied. There were fewer problems measuring the longitudinal velocity than shear velocity. While the tension predictions worked in the laboratory tests, the tension could not be accurately calculated for any of the field sites. This is because we were not able to obtain the longitudinal or shear velocities in an unstressed state or precise measurements of the longitudinal and shear velocities due to the lack of knowledge of the precise length of the rods in the tensioned state.
  • Red River Structure Physical Model Study: Bulkhead Testing

    Abstract: The US Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, and its non-federal sponsors are designing and constructing a flood risk management project that will reduce the risk of flooding in the Fargo-Moorhead metropolitan area. There is a 30-mile long diversion channel around the west side of the city of Fargo, as well as a staging area that will be formed upstream of a 20-mile long dam (referred to as the Southern Embankment) that collectively includes an earthen embankment with three gated structures: the Diversion Inlet Structure, the Wild Rice River Structure, and the Red River Structure (RRS). A physical model has been constructed and analyzed to assess the hydraulic conditions near and at the RRS for verification of the structure’s flow capacity as well as optimization of design features for the structure. This report describes the modeling techniques and instrumentation used in the investigation and details the evaluation of the forces exerted on the proposed bulkheads during emergency operations for the RRS.
  • Finite element analysis of quoin block deterioration and load transfer mechanisms in miter gates: pintle and pintle connections

    Abstract: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) currently operates and maintains approximately 193 commercially active lock sites with 239 locks and dams spanning nearly 12,000 miles. These networks of water channels are used to transport 600 million tons of domestic cargo, generating $405 billion in revenue annually. Nearly 60% of these structures in operation are over 50 years old and have reached design life. A failure of the miter gates could result in a major negative impact on the economy and on the ability to maintain flood control. Administrators need recommendations to better prioritize maintenance and repair of the USACE miter gates. This work investigated the influence of miter gate’s quoin block degradation on load transfer to the pintle and/or pintle connections. Results of finite element analysis are reported for the quoin block degradation simulated levels of 0%, 25%, 50%, and 75%. The parametric study shows the overstressed regions are the pintle neck and bolt-hole regions. To improve pintle designs so they may better mitigate detrimental environmental based deterioration effects, this work recommends (1) increasing the thickness of the bolt-hole connection region and (2) adding ribbing reinforcement around the neck area of the pintle.
  • Hydraulic Dike Effects Investigation on the Mississippi River: Natchez to Baton Rouge

    Abstract: This report documents an investigation of the hydraulic effects of dikes on water levels in the Mississippi River between Natchez, MS, and Baton Rouge, LA, conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division, Vicksburg, MS. The investigation was conducted using a previously calibrated Natchez-to-Baton Rouge Adaptive Hydraulics numerical model. The objectives were to alter roughness and height variables associated with the dikes and overbanks encompassed in the numerical model and evaluate their effects on water surface elevations. Steady flow simulations were simulated for 12 May 2011 to investigate the variation in model results during the peak of the 2011 flood on the Mississippi River.
  • Empirical analysis of effects of dike systems on channel morphology of the Lower Mississippi River

    NOTE: There was an title error in MRG&P Report No. 36, which was published 3/2/2021 . A new PDF has been attached to the record with the correct title. This email has the correct title as well. No other changes were made.
  • Investigation of Testing Materials for the Chickamauga Lock and Dam Reconstruction Project

    Abstract: In support of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Nashville District, a preliminary investigation of concrete materials was conducted pursuant to re-construction at the Chickamauga Lock and Dam located near Chattanooga, TN. Local materials provided to the U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center (ERDC) for testing included three different coarse aggregate gradations, two fine aggregate sources, two type I/II cements, a fly ash sources, a slag cement, a silica fume, and a limestone powder. Aggregate tests consisted of sieve analysis, specific gravity, absorption, materials finer than No. 200, organic impurities, soundness, LA abrasion, clay lumps and friable particles, flat and elongated particles, lightweight particles, petrography, and freezing and thawing. All cementitious and admixture materials were tested for chemical and physical properties based on appropriate specifications. This report presents the material characteristic results determined by laboratory testing in accordance with American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) procedures or regulating specification criteria.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Investigation of Materials for Charleroi Lock and Dam Monongahela River Reconstruction Project

    Abstract: The investigation described in this report was conducted for the U.S. Army Engineer District, Pittsburgh as part of a preliminary investigation of cementitious materials and concrete design pursuant to construction of Charleroi Lock and Dam Monongahela River Reconstruction Project. Local materials provided to the U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center (ERDC) for testing included three different coarse aggregate gradations, two fine aggregate sources, a type II (MH) cement, four fly ash sources, a slag cement, a silica fume, a limestone powder, five admixtures, and two water sources. Aggregate tests consisted of sieve analysis, specific gravity, absorption, materials finer than No. 200, organic impurities, soundness, LA abrasion, clay lumps and friable particles, flat and elongated particles, lightweight particles, and petrography. All cementitious, admixtures, and water-source materials were tested for chemical and physical properties based on appropriate specifications. In addition, four mixture proportions developed by the ERDC for this project in 2005 were scaled to determine the early stiffening of mortar, freezing and thawing, and heat of hydration. This report presents the material characteristic results determined by laboratory testing in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials procedures or regulating specification criteria.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Incidence of Zebra Mussel on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Structures

     Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/35273Report Number: ERDC/CERL TR-20-2Title: Incidence of Zebra Mussel on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers StructuresBy K. James Hay, Irene E. MacAllister, Rebekah C. Wilson, and Abigail M. BrakeApproved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited January 2020Abstract: Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are