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  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Three Rivers, Southeast Arkansas Navigation Study: Ship Simulation Report

    Abstract: The McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River System (MKARNS) is a major inland waterway that begins at the Port of Catoosa in Tulsa, OK, and travels to the confluence of the White and Mississippi Rivers. Over the years, many structures have been built to help control overland flow between the White, Arkansas, and Mississippi Rivers. These structures have required a significant amount of rehabilitation, which has resulted in high maintenance costs. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Arkansas Waterways Commission conducted the Three Rivers Southeast Arkansas Feasibility Study (also known as the Three Rivers Study). The Three Rivers Study focused on providing long-term dependable navigation in the MKARNS. From this study, a proposal was developed that included a 1,000 ft reopening of the Historic Cutoff and a reinforcement of several areas near the White River. In 2019, the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center Ship/Tow Simulator was used to perform a navigation study to ensure the proposed modifications did not negatively impact navigation on the White River section of the MKARNS. Assessment of the proposed modifications was accomplished through analysis of ship simulations completed by experienced pilots, discussions, track plots, run sheets, and final pilot surveys.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Hydraulic Analysis and Modeling of Navigation Conditions near the Mississippi River Bridges in Vicksburg, Mississippi

    Abstract: The River and Estuarine Engineering Branch of the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory developed a two-dimensional numerical model of the Mississippi River near Vicksburg, MS, using Adaptive Hydraulics to investigate navigation conditions through the Interstate 20 and Old Highway 80 Bridges reach. A focus of the study was determining the Marshall Brown Dikes impact to velocities and navigation through the reach. Proposed dikes, focused on improving currents, were also tested to determine if they are a feasible option to improve navigability through the bridges. A second proposed alternative, a levee to protect the articulated concrete mattress (ACM) field, was also simulated to determine if flood damage to the ACM field could be successfully reduced without negatively impacting navigation. Velocity data from 2008 throughout the reach of concern were used for validation along with water surface elevation data from 2008, 2011, 2016, and 2018. The Marshall Brown Dikes were shown to have a localized impact on velocities near the dikes, but the changes to the velocity downstream near the bridge were negligible for all tested flow rates. Simulations of the proposed dikes did not result in an improvement to navigation conditions, but the proposed levee was successful in decreasing velocities and depths over the ACM field.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Evaluation of the Potential Impacts of the Proposed Mobile Harbor Navigation Channel Expansion on the Aquatic Resources of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Abstract: This report assesses potential impacts to aquatic resources resulting from proposed navigation channel expansion activities within Mobile Bay, Alabama. This work was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Mobile District, to support development of a supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. Changes in water quality and hydrodynamics were evaluated for potential impacts to benthic macroinvertebrates, wetlands, submerged aquatic vegetation, oysters, and fish. The assessment includes extensive characterization of baseline conditions, evaluation of estimated post-project conditions related to aquatic resource habitat (e.g., changes in salinity, dissolved oxygen). An analysis of potential impacts related to a 0.5-m sea level rise scenario were also evaluated. Results suggest that no substantial impacts in aquatic resources within the study area are anticipated due to project implementation, as the area of greatest potential changes to environmental conditions are already adapted to natural shifts in salinity (and other factors), and to conditions resulting from the existing navigation channel. Although sea level rise has the potential to alter aquatic resource habitats with Mobile Bay, additional impacts related to project implementation remain negligible under the 0.5-m sea level rise scenario.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Towing Vessel Delays and Barge Lane Navigability along the Houston Ship Channel, Texas

     Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/35182Report Number: ERDC/CHL TR-20-1Title: Towing Vessel Delays and Barge Lane Navigability along the Houston Ship Channel, TexasBy Kenneth N. Mitchell, Patricia K. DiJoseph, Brandan M. Scully, and Marin M. KressApproved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited January 2020Abstract: This project used
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Measuring Climate and Extreme Weather Vulnerability to Inform Resilience Report 2: Port Decision-Makers’ Barriers to Climate and Extreme Weather Adaption

     Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/35199Report Number: ERDC/CHL CR-19-3Title: Measuring Climate and Extreme Weather Vulnerability to Inform Resilience Report 2: Port Decision-Makers’ Barriers to Climate and Extreme Weather AdaptionBy Elizabeth L. Mclean and Austin Becker Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited November
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Towing Vessel Delays and Barge Lane Navigability along the Houston Ship Channel, Texas

     Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/35182Report Number: ERDC/CHL TR-20-1Title: Towing Vessel Delays and Barge Lane Navigability along the Houston Ship Channel, TexasBy Kenneth N. Mitchell, Patricia K. DiJoseph, Brandan M. Scully, and Marin M. KressApproved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited January 2020Abstract: This project used