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  • May

    Freshwater snail population believed extinct, rediscovered

    Researchers with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) are working with the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science to examine the habitat association, distribution levels and substrate preference of the Big Black Rocksnail.
  • Engineering With Nature: An Atlas, Volume 3 Showcases Global Innovation and Collaboration in Nature-Based Solutions

    The newest edition of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Engineering With Nature (EWN) Atlas series, Volume 3, will be released May 22, 2024. Building on the success of its predecessors, Volume 3 continues to spotlight the remarkable projects and initiatives harnessing the power of nature-based solutions (NBS) around the world.
  • March

    ERDC research aims to model, combat respiratory infections

    A cross-laboratory team of U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) researchers has launched a new project that seeks to revolutionize the way military bases prepare for and combat respiratory infections, with implications that could reach far beyond military installations and into public spaces across the globe.
  • February

    ERDC researchers assess time-of-year restrictions for James River dredging

    Researchers at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s (ERDC) Environmental Laboratory (EL) are conducting field studies along the lower James River in Virginia to assess the environmental impacts of dredging and if they continue to justify the existing time-of-year restrictions (TOYR) for dredging in the area.
  • December

    ERDC researchers combat cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms

    The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s (ERDC) Environmental Laboratory (EL) recently completed field trials in Massachusetts and Connecticut, using germicidal ultraviolet light (UV-C) to sustainably suppress and potentially eradicate cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) without using chemicals or causing off-target ecological effects.
  • November

    ERDC’s Environmental Laboratory’s graphene research leads to a collaboration with NASA

    Scientists and engineers from the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center's (ERDC) Environmental Laboratory (EL) are conducting research that could lead to sustaining and advancing technology more efficiently and at a lower cost, both on Earth and in space.
  • October

    ERDC researchers experiment on remediation of Coal Combustion Residuals

    Researchers with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) are experimenting on the phytostabilization potential and biomonitoring of heavy metals, specifically selenium and arsenic that come from contaminated soil and groundwater at coal combustion residuals (CCRs) storage sites.
  • September

    ERDC-Vicksburg laboratories celebrate 25th anniversary with Open House

    Laboratories from across the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) showcased their expertise, experiments and research as part of a celebration honoring the agency's 25th anniversary.
  • ERDC assists the New England District in the management of hydrilla

    The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s (ERDC) Aquatic Plant Management Team in the Environmental Laboratory is working alongside the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New England District to research and develop effective methods in managing the aquatic invasive plant species hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) in the Connecticut River.
  • New Orleans District’s Canda Lorson selected for ERDC University

    Researchers from 10 U.S. Army Corps of Engineer Districts have been selected for the 2023 session of the Engineer Research and Development Center University (ERDC-U). Canda Lorson, a hydrologist with the New Orleans District, was chosen to participate in the detail program, now in its eighth year.
  • August

    Jacksonville District’s Ian Markovich selected for ERDC University

    Researchers from 10 U.S. Army Corps of Engineer Districts have been selected for the 2023 session of the Engineer Research and Development Center University (ERDC-U). Ian Markovich, a biologist with the Jacksonville District, was chosen to participate in this detail program.
  • July

    ERDC labs lead modernization of dredging evaluation guidance, tools for environmental compliance decisions

    The project delivery team for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Dredging Operations and Environmental Research, or DOER, Project 19-11 recently published technical guidance and tools for modernizing the conduct of dredging evaluations for open water disposal compliance.
  • June

    ERDC scientists assist USACE New Orleans District with turbidity assessment at Bayou Rigaud

    Scientists from the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Environmental Laboratory (ERDC-EL) recently assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New Orleans District in measuring the turbidity near a dredging operation in the Bayou Rigaud Federal Navigation Channel.
  • ERDC Researchers Co-lead Multiagency Team to Service Prototype Underwater Acoustic Deterrent System

    Researchers from the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), along with scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and other partners, are currently working on a project to test the effectiveness of underwater sound technology on invasive carps — Bighead Carp, Silver Carp, Black Carp and Grass Carp — and the response of various native species of interest throughout the Mississippi River and Great Lakes basins, as well as additional native watersheds.
  • March

    Dr. Robert “Bob” Engler with ERDC conference room dedication

    A conference room in the Environmental Laboratory at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center was recently dedicated in memory of a longtime employee, the late Dr. Robert “Bob” Engler.
  • February

    ERDC researcher aids work in Australia, South Africa to combat invasive weed

    For more than a decade, Dr. Nathan Harms, a research biologist with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s (ERDC) Environmental Laboratory (EL), has been assisting the Australian government, and more recently South Africa, with the biological control of the invasive delta arrowhead.
  • ERDC scientist named USACE Researcher of the Year

    Dr. Benjamin Trump, a research social scientist with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s (ERDC) Environmental Laboratory (EL), was recently named U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Researcher of the Year.
  • November

    Engineering With Nature initiative contributes to White House roadmap for accelerating nature-based solutions

    VICKSBURG, Miss. — U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Engineering With Nature (EWN) leaders contributed to a White House interagency report released Nov. 8 about opportunities for the federal government to accelerate the implementation of nature-based solutions (NBS). “The report provides a roadmap with five strategic recommendations for federal agencies to implement, and it provides an agency resource guide of thirty NBS examples in action,” said Dr. Todd Bridges, national lead of EWN.
  • October

    ERDC’s Martinez-Guerra applies military installation expertise to Jackson water crisis

    VICKSBURG, Miss., - By now, many have heard of the recent water crisis affecting the city of Jackson, Mississippi. Many may not realize, however, that a research environmental engineer from the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Environmental Laboratory, Dr. Edith Martinez-Guerra, applied her expertise with military installations to help assess the troubled system.
  • Davis leaves mark on ERDC after 42 years

    Worker retention is a problem facing many enterprises across the country. In fact, a recent study released by Gallup showed that millennials — those between the ages of 25 and 34 — expect to change jobs about every three years. Working for a single company for the life of a person’s career seems to be a thing of the past.