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  • Additive Regulated Concrete for Thermally Extreme Conditions

    Abstract: This study details a multiprong effort to validate the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory’s solution for concrete construction and repair in cold weather, Additive Regulated Concrete for Thermally Extreme Conditions (ARCTEC). ARCTEC is the product of several years of research and consists of a testing and simulation workflow which generates scenario-sensitive guidance for use of accelerating admixtures in concrete. This report details efforts to validate ARCTEC using real-world, full-scale, field demonstrations. These demonstrations were used to collect data on the behavior of concrete obtained through conventional supply chains, to assess the accuracy of the simulation component of the workflow, and test efficacy of ARCTEC guidance in achieving frost protection. Results indicate that ARCTEC is at a high level of maturity, and provides additive dosage guidance that ensures frost protection and strength development in concrete placed where overnight lows fall as low as 0°F. The effort and cost required to implement ARCTEC as a cold weather protection strategy is minimal, and significantly less burdensome than conventional methods. Any cold region installation with a winter construction or repair needs and access to conventional concrete supply chains could field ARCTEC, and reduce the cost and schedule constraints associated with winter construction.
  • Long-term performance of sustainable pavements using ternary blended concrete with recycled aggregates

    Abstract: Dwindling supplies of natural concrete aggregates, the cost of landfilling construction waste, and interest in sustainable design have increased the demand for recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) in new portland cement concrete mixtures. RCA repurposes waste material to provide useful ingredients for new construction applications. However, RCA can reduce the performance of the concrete. This study investigated the effectiveness of ternary blended binders, mixtures containing portland cement and two different supplementary cementitious materials, at mitigating performance losses of concrete mixtures with RCA materials. Concrete mixtures with different ternary binder combinations were batched with four recycled concrete aggregate materials. For the materials used, the study found that a blend of portland cement, Class C fly ash, and blast furnace slag produced the highest strength of ternary binder. At 50% replacement of virgin aggregates and ternary blended binder, some specimens showed comparable mechanical performance to a control mix of only portland cement as a binder and no RCA substitution. This study demonstrates that even at 50% RCA replacement, using the appropriate ternary binder can create a concrete mixture that performs similarly to a plain portland cement concrete without RCA, with the added benefit of being environmentally beneficial.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Effects of Boric Acid and Water Content on Fundamental Properties of Proprietary Magnesium Phosphate Cement (MPC) Products

    Abstract: Magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) have been used for decades in proprietary products for pavement repairs. However, products with high exothermic temperatures have short working times, and research is needed to overcome these unfavorable characteristics. The effects of different boric acid and water contents on the fundamental properties of concrete was investigated through 34 trial batch modifications on the following commercially available MPC products: (1) Premier Magnesia’s PREMag PGDM, (2) BASF Master Builder’s MasterEmaco T545, and (3) CeraTech Inc.’s Pavemend TR. Overall results indicated that the increase of boric acid and water content produced favorable decreased temperatures and increased set times but retardation in the early age development of compressive strength. Modifications in the PREMag PGDM product resulted in poor workability, inaccurate time of setting due to a thixotropic nature, and unacceptable compressive strength loss. The Pavemend TR product was significantly affected by the addition of boric acid resulting in nonrecoverable compressive and bond strength loss, excessive expansions, failure at low freezing and thawing cycles, and unacceptable times of setting for rapid-repair applications. The T545 product showed promising performance with 28-day recovery in compressive, flexural, and bond strengths and minimal differences in other properties when compared to the control mixture.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Development of Magnesium Phosphate Cement (MPC) Concrete Mixture Proportioning for Airfield Pavements: Laboratory and Field Validation MPC Test Report

     Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/35475Report Number: ERDC/GSL TR-20-4Title: Development of Magnesium Phosphate Cement (MPC) Concrete Mixture Proportioning for Airfield Pavements:Laboratory and Field Validation MPC Test ReportBy Monica A. Ramsey, Dylan A. Scott, Charles A. Weiss Jr., and Jeb S. TingleApproved for Public Release; Distribution