ERDC Library Menu

Redirecting...

Contact

erdclibrary@ask-a-librarian.info

601.501.7632 - text
601.634.2355 - voice

 

Search the ERDC Library

About the Library

The ERDC Library supports the mission-related research needs of ERDC scientists and engineers at three physical locations with a centralized library catalog and web site. It also hosts an online digital repository of ERDC-authored reports.

The ERDC Library collection is available for interlibrary loan. Please contact your local library for all interlibrary loan requests. Other requests should be directed to the reference staff.

Additionally the library provides access to:

  • 300,000+ items in the collection - 28,000+ online journals - 34,000+ online books & reports
  • Online research resources including IEEE, Science Direct, Web of Science, RefWorks
  • Collection development and interlibrary loan services
  • Research consultations, training, and outreach services
  • Support for copyright questions and support for research and administrative initiatives

Social Media

Publication Notices

Results:
Tag: geospatial data
Clear
  • Incorporating Terrain Roughness into Helicopter Landing Zone Site Selection by Using the Geomorphic Oscillation Assessment Tool (GOAT) v1.0

    ABSTRACT: The Geomorphic Oscillation Assessment Tool (GOAT) quantifies terrain roughness as a mechanism to better explain forward arming and refueling point (FARP) suitability for Army aviation. An empirically driven characteristic of FARP consideration, surface roughness is a key discriminator for site utility in complex terrain. GOAT uses a spatial sampling of high-resolution elevation and land cover data to construct data frames, which enable a relational analysis of component and aggregate site suitability. By incorporating multiple criteria from various doctrinal sources, GOAT produces a composite quality assessment of the areal options available to the aviation commander. This report documents and demonstrates version 1.0 of the GOAT algorithms developed by the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC). These details will allow users familiar with R to implement it as a stand-alone program or in R Studio.
  • Monitoring Ecological Restoration with Imagery Tools (MERIT): Python-based Decision Support Tools Integrated into ArcGIS for Satellite and UAS Image Processing, Analysis, and Classification

    Abstract: Monitoring the impacts of ecosystem restoration strategies requires both short-term and long-term land surface monitoring. The combined use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and satellite imagery enable effective landscape and natural resource management. However, processing, analyzing, and creating derivative imagery products can be time consuming, manually intensive, and cost prohibitive. In order to provide fast, accurate, and standardized UAS and satellite imagery processing, we have developed a suite of easy-to-use tools integrated into the graphical user interface (GUI) of ArcMap and ArcGIS Pro as well as open-source solutions using NodeOpenDroneMap. We built the Monitoring Ecological Restoration with Imagery Tools (MERIT) using Python and leveraging third-party libraries and open-source software capabilities typically unavailable within ArcGIS. MERIT will save US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) districts significant time in data acquisition, processing, and analysis by allowing a user to move from image acquisition and preprocessing to a final output for decision-making with one application. Although we designed MERIT for use in wetlands research, many tools have regional or global relevancy for a variety of environmental monitoring initiatives.
  • Evaluation of Automated Feature Extraction Algorithms Using High-resolution Satellite Imagery Across a Rural-urban Gradient in Two Unique Cities in Developing Countries

    Abstract: Feature extraction algorithms are routinely leveraged to extract building footprints and road networks into vector format. When used in conjunction with high resolution remotely sensed imagery, machine learning enables the automation of such feature extraction workflows. However, many of the feature extraction algorithms currently available have not been thoroughly evaluated in a scientific manner within complex terrain such as the cities of developing countries. This report details the performance of three automated feature extraction (AFE) datasets: Ecopia, Tier 1, and Tier 2, at extracting building footprints and roads from high resolution satellite imagery as compared to manual digitization of the same areas. To avoid environmental bias, this assessment was done in two different regions of the world: Maracay, Venezuela and Niamey, Niger. High, medium, and low urban density sites are compared between regions. We quantify the accuracy of the data and time needed to correct the three AFE datasets against hand digitized reference data across ninety tiles in each city, selected by stratified random sampling. Within each tile, the reference data was compared against the three AFE datasets, both before and after analyst editing, using the accuracy assessment metrics of Intersection over Union and F1 Score for buildings and roads, as well as Average Path Length Similarity (APLS) to measure road network connectivity. It was found that of the three AFE tested, the Ecopia data most frequently outperformed the other AFE in accuracy and reduced the time needed for editing.
  • Microscale Dynamics between Dust and Microorganisms in Alpine Snowpack

    ABSTRACT:  Dust particles carry microbial and chemical signatures from source regions to deposition regions. Dust and its occupying microorganisms are incorporated into, and can alter, snowpack physical properties including snow structure and resultant radiative and mechanical properties that in turn affect larger-scale properties, including surrounding hydrology and maneuverability. Microorganisms attached to deposited dust maintain genetic evidence of source substrates and can be potentially used as bio-sensors. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of dust-associated microbial deposition on snowpack and microstructure. As part of this effort, we characterized the microbial communities deposited through dust transport, examined dust provenance, and identified the microscale location and fate of dust within a changing snow matrix. We found dust characteristics varied with deposition event and that dust particles were generally embedded in the snow grains, with a small fraction of the dust particles residing on the exterior of the snow matrix. Dust deposition appears to retard expected late season snow grain growth. Both bacteria and fungi were identified in the collected snow samples.
  • PUBLICATION NOTIFICATION: Local Spatial Dispersion for Multiscale Modeling of Geospatial Data: Exploring Dispersion Measures to Determine Optimal Raster Data Sample Sizes

    ABSTRACT: Scale, or spatial resolution, plays a key role in interpreting the spatial structure of remote sensing imagery or other geospatially dependent data. These data are provided at various spatial scales. Determination of an optimal sample or pixel size can benefit geospatial models and environmental algorithms for information extraction that require multiple datasets at different resolutions. To address this, an analysis was conducted of multiple scale factors of spatial resolution to determine an optimal sample size for a geospatial dataset. Under the NET-CMO project at ERDC-GRL, a new approach was developed and implemented for determining optimal pixel sizes for images with disparate and heterogeneous spatial structure. The application of local spatial dispersion was investigated as a three-dimensional function to be optimized in a resampled image space. Images were resampled to progressively coarser spatial resolutions and stacked to create an image space within which pixel-level maxima of dispersion was mapped. A weighted mean of dispersion and sample sizes associated with the set of local maxima was calculated to determine a single optimal sample size for an image or dataset. This size best represents the spatial structure present in the data and is optimal for further geospatial modeling.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: New and Enhanced Tools for Civil Military Operations (NET-CMO)

    Abstract: Civil Military Operations (CMO) associated geospatial modeling is intended to enable increased knowledge of regional stability, assist in Foreign Humanitarian Assistance (FHA), and provide support to Force Health Protection (FHP) operational planning tasks. However, current geoenabled methodologies and technologies are lacking in their overall capacity to support complex mission analysis efforts focused on understanding these important stability factors and mitigating threats to Army soldiers and civilian populations. CMO analysts, planners, and decision-makers do not have a robust capability to both spatially and quantitatively identify Regions of Interest (ROI), which may experience a proliferation in health risks such as vector-borne diseases in areas of future conflict. Additionally, due to this general absence of geoenabled health assessment models and derived end-products, CMO stakeholders are adversely impacted in their Military Decision Making Process (MDMP) capabilities to develop comprehensive area studies and plans such as Course of Action (COA). The NET-CMO project is focused on fostering emerging geoenabling capabilities and technologies to improve military situational awareness for assessment and planning of potential health threat-risk vulnerabilities.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Spatial Downscaling Disease Risk Using Random Forests Machine Learning

     Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/35618Report Number: ERDC/GRL TN-20-1Title: Spatial Downscaling Disease Risk Using Random Forests Machine LearningBy Sean P. GriffinApproved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited February 2020Purpose: Mosquito-borne illnesses are a significant public health concern, both to the Department of Defense