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The ERDC Library supports the mission-related research needs of ERDC scientists and engineers at three physical locations with a centralized library catalog and web site. It also hosts an online digital repository of ERDC-authored reports.

The ERDC Library collection is available for interlibrary loan. Please contact your local library for all interlibrary loan requests. Other requests should be directed to the reference staff.

Additionally the library provides access to:

  • 300,000+ items in the collection - 28,000+ online journals - 34,000+ online books & reports
  • Online research resources including IEEE, Science Direct, Web of Science, RefWorks
  • Collection development and interlibrary loan services
  • Research consultations, training, and outreach services
  • Support for copyright questions and support for research and administrative initiatives

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Publication Notices

  • Development of CORPS-STIF 1.0 with Application to Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC)

    Abstract: This report introduces the first release of CORPS-STIF (Concrete Observations Repository and Predictive Software – Structural and Thermodynamical Integrated Framework). CORPS-STIF is envisioned to be used as a tool to optimize material constituents and geometries of mass concrete placements specifically for ultra-high performance concretes (UHPCs). An observations repository (OR) containing results of 649 mechanical property tests and 10 thermodynamical tests were recorded to be used as inputs for current and future releases. A thermodynamical integrated framework (TIF) was developed where the heat transfer coefficient was a function of temperature and determined at each time step. A structural integrated framework (SIF) modeled strength development in cylinders that underwent isothermal curing. CORPS-STIF represents a step toward understanding and predicting strength gain of UHPC for full-scale structures and specifically in mass concrete.
  • Automated Characterization of Ridge-Swale Patterns Along the Mississippi River

    Abstract: The orientation of constructed levee embankments relative to alluvial swales is a useful measure for identifying regions susceptible to backward erosion piping (BEP). This research was conducted to create an automated, efficient process to classify patterns and orientations of swales within the Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) to support levee risk assessments. Two machine learning algorithms are used to train the classification models: a convolutional neural network and a U-net. The resulting workflow can identify linear topographic features but is unable to reliably differentiate swales from other features, such as the levee structure and riverbanks. Further tuning of training data or manual identification of regions of interest could yield significantly better results. The workflow also provides an orientation to each linear feature to support subsequent analyses of position relative to levee alignments. While the individual models fall short of immediate applicability, the procedure provides a feasible, automated scheme to assist in swale classification and characterization within mature alluvial valley systems similar to LMV.
  • The Demonstration and Validation of a Linked Watershed-Riverine Modeling System for DoD Installations: User Guidance Report Version 2.0

    Abstract: A linked watershed model was evaluated on three watersheds within the U.S.: (1) House Creek Watershed, Fort Hood, TX; (2) Calleguas Creek Watershed, Ventura County, CA; and (3) Patuxent River Watershed, MD. The goal of this demonstration study was to show the utility of such a model in addressing water quality issues facing DoD installations across a variety of climate zones. In performing the demonstration study, evaluations of model output with regards to accuracy, predictability and meeting regulatory drivers were completed. Data availability, level of modeling expertise, and costs for model setup, validation, scenario analysis, and maintenance were evaluated in order to inform installation managers on the time and cost investment needed to use a linked watershed modeling system. Final conclusions were that the system evaluated in this study would be useful for answering a variety of questions posed by installation managers and could be useful in developing management scenarios to better control pollutant runoff from installations.
  • Classical and Innovative Methods of Fatigue and Fracture Repairs in Navigation Steel Structures

    Abstract: Most of the hydraulic steel structures (HSS) in the U.S. have reached or have past their design life, which leads to unsatisfactory performance. Welded connections with low fatigue resistance, poor weld quality, unanticipated structural behavior, or unexpected loading due to the deterioration of the design boundary conditions are the causes of fatigue cracking. The purpose of this report is to identify and evaluate the traditional and new methods used for fatigue and fracture repairs in navigation steel structures to restore their load carrying capacity and fatigue and fracture resistance. The final objective was to generate a guidance report comprising of recommended and more efficient repair methods for the different fatigue limit states observed in navigation steel structures.
  • Detecting Clandestine Tunnels by Using Near-Surface Seismic Techniques

    Abstract: Geophysical detection of clandestine tunnels is a complex problem that has been met with limited success. Multiple methods have been applied spanning several decades, but a reliable solution has yet to be found. This report presents shallow seismic data collected at a tunnel test site representative of geologic settings found along the southwestern U.S. border. Results demonstrate the capability of using compressional wave diffraction and surface-wave backscatter techniques to detect a purpose-built subterranean tunnel. Near-surface seismic data were also collected at multiple sites in Afghanistan to detect and locate subsurface anomalies (e.g., data collected over an escape tunnel discovered in 2011 at the Sarposa Prison in Kandahar, Afghanistan, which allowed more than 480 prisoners to escape, and data from another shallow tunnel recently discovered at an undisclosed location). The final example from Afghanistan is the first time surface-based seismic methods have detected a tunnel whose presence and location were not previously known. Seismic results directly led to the discovery of the tunnel. Interpreted tunnel locations for all examples were less than 2 m of the actual location. Seismic surface wave backscatter and body-wave diffraction methods show promise for efficient data acquisition and processing for locating purposefully hidden tunnels within unconsolidated sediments.
  • Lock Operation Improvements

    Abstract: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) owns or operates 236 locks at 191 sites (HQUSACE 2016). Although the locks at these sites generally perform reliably, more than half of these structures have surpassed their 50-year economic design life and as such, there are increasing concerns about their continued safe, reliable operation. This work was undertaken to review lock operating equipment, maintenance practices, records pertaining to accidents and equipment failures, and lighting systems; to identify alternative improvements to equipment and equipment maintenance practices; and to analyze and compare those alternatives to determine and recommend optimal solutions. This report documents some lessons learned, primarily to share information that others might find useful. Note that the recommendations in this report should not be viewed as policy, although some might be considered by those creating policy.
  • Methodology for Remote Assessment of Pavement Distresses from Point Cloud Analysis

    Abstract: The ability to remotely assess road and airfield pavement condition is critical to dynamic basing, contingency deployment, convoy entry and sustainment, and post-attack reconnaissance. Current Army processes to evaluate surface condition are time-consuming and require Soldier presence. Recent developments in the area of photogrammetry and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) enable rapid generation of three-dimensional point cloud models of the pavement surface. Point clouds were generated from data collected on a series of asphalt, concrete, and unsurfaced pavements using ground- and aerial-based sensors. ERDC-developed algorithms automatically discretize the pavement surface into cross- and grid-based sections to identify physical surface distresses such as depressions, ruts, and cracks. Depressions can be sized from the point-to-point distances bounding each depression, and surface roughness is determined based on the point heights along a given cross section. Noted distresses are exported to a distress map file containing only the distress points and their locations for later visualization and quality control along with classification and quantification. Further research and automation into point cloud analysis is ongoing with the goal of enabling Soldiers with limited training the capability to rapidly assess pavement surface condition from a remote platform.
  • Channel Assessment Tools for Rapid Watershed Assessment

    Purpose: Existing Delta Headwaters Project (DHP) watershed stabilization studies are focused on restoration and stabilization of degraded stream systems. The original watershed studies formerly under the Demonstration Erosion Control (DEC) Project started in the mid 1980s. The watershed stabilization activities are continuing, and because of the vast number of degraded watersheds and limited amount of yearly funding, there is a need for developing a rapid watershed assessment approach to determine which watersheds to prioritize for further work. The goal of this project is to test the FluvialGeomorph (FG) toolkit to determine if the Rapid Geomorphic Assessment approach can identify channel stability trends in Campbell Creek and its main tributary. The FG toolkit (Haring et al. 2019; Haring et al. 2020) is a new rapid watershed assessment approach using high-resolution terrain data (Light Detection and Ranging [LiDAR]) to support U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) watershed planning. One of the principal goals of the USACE SMART (Specific Measureable Attainable Risk-Informed Timely) Planning is to leverage existing data and resources to complete studies. The FG approach uses existing LiDAR to rapidly assess either reach-specific analysis for smaller more focused studies or larger watersheds or ecosystems. The rapid assessment capability can reduce the time and cost of planning by using existing information to complete a preliminary watershed assessment and provide rapid results regarding where to focus more detailed study efforts.
  • THE POWER OF ERDC: ERDC 2020–2030 STRATEGY

    Abstract: The ERDC 2020–2030 Strategy outlines the origination of the organization, future direction, and the methods used to accomplish its research and development mission. The Strategy details the Ends (where we are going and why), the Ways (how we will get there), and the Means (the resources needed to get there) by which we will achieve the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) strategy. To realize its vision and maintain its world-class status, ERDC strives to be the go-to organization for the Warfighter and the nation to solve large complex problems in its mission space. To strengthen the outcomes from the Ends, Ways, and Means, ERDC has adopted the philosophy of the Understand- Predict-Shape (UPS) paradigm. The UPS paradigm maximizes the potential of ERDC’s current research programs and helps contemplate, develop, and define the organization’s future portfolio. UPS represents a holistic view of the operational environment: How to better Understand the Present, Predict the Future, and Shape the Outcome. The ERDC leadership team has looked toward the future and defined major strategic Science and Technology campaigns that offer challenges that ERDC can, and should, effectively address.
  • Modeling the Effect of Increased Sediment Loading on Bed Elevations of the Lower Missouri River

    Purpose: This US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Regional Sediment Management Technical Note (RSM-TN) documents the effects of increased sediment loading to the Missouri River on bed elevations in the lower 498 miles. This was accomplished using a one-dimensional (1D) HEC-RAS 5.0.7 sediment model.

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