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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Engineer Research & Development Center
Cold Regions Research & Engineering Lab
ATTN: CEERD-PA-H
72 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755-1290

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL)

Lab hosts students’ quest for knowledge of the Arctic
Lab hosts students’ quest for knowledge of the Arctic
The U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory recently hosted a visit of Colby-Sawyer College students studying Life in the Arctic at the Hanover, New Hampshire, campus. Polar Researcher Dr. Chris Polashenski provided an overview presentation of CRREL’s Arctic research program. The students also visited the biochemistry lab for a briefing by Physical Scientist Robert “RJ” Jones on microbes in ancient soils that were collected from the lab’s Fox Permafrost Tunnel, Scientist Bruce Elder shared his work on sea ice and glacial cores. Additionally, researchers shared with the students the renaming of Barrow, Alaska, to its traditional Iñupiat name, Utqiaġvik, which refers to a place for gathering wild roots. Utqiaġvik has been home to the Iñupiat, an indigenous ethnic group, for more than 1,500 years.
Cold Regions Lab retires sea ice expert
Cold Regions Lab retires sea ice expert
During one of his many Arctic field trips, geophysicist Dr. Donald Perovich takes measurements of the sea ice cover while standing with instrumentation in a melt pond. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s Hanover site recently retired Perovich in a ceremony at the New Hampshire laboratory.
Predicting the Arctic sea ice, piece by piece
Predicting the Arctic sea ice, piece by piece
A discrete element model shows explicit ice floes, cracks and lead formation in the Beaufort Sea north of Alaska.
Improving mobility in cold weather operations
Improving mobility in cold weather operations
An M88 Armored Recovery Vehicle lifts a truck on snow. Snow and ice can render the ARV ineffective in recovery operations.
Scientist supports Marine Corps mountain communications training
Scientist supports Marine Corps mountain communications training
Dr. Dan Breton is working to provide extended radio communications with the Marines through manipulation of frequencies to suit the environment. In the photo, a Marine makes radio contact with base camp, while participating in the Mountain Warfare Training Center’s Mountain Communications course. The course’s Mountain Mobility portion consists of navigating nearly nine miles over the Sierra Nevada Mountain, while maintaining communications with the base camp along the way. Breton is a researcher with the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory.

News

Cold Regions Lab retires sea ice expert

HANOVER, N.H. (Oct. 27, 2017) -- Dr. Donald Perovich, an internationally recognized Arctic sea ice
[Published: 11/9/2017]

Predicting the Arctic sea ice, piece by piece

HANOVER, N.H. (Oct. 23, 2107) - Viewed from an airplane or a ship’s deck, Arctic sea ice can appear
[Published: 10/25/2017]

Improving mobility in cold weather operations

Mobility and maneuverability experts know that movements on the battlefield can be severely impacted
[Published: 10/19/2017]